International School Award: Refugee Week

 

During the June Refugee Week, we will focus the children on the plight and challenges of World refugees. As an increasing global concern and with wider media focus, this topic is a really important global subject which we added to our global curriculum last year.

Children look at the origins of refugees both historically and geographically and use different strategies to learn about their plight.

 

Year 3 used drama to create still frames based on the story "The Colour of Home" before turning these into a Comic Strip about the plight of refugee, Hassan.

 

Year 3 - Refugee Week Informal Letters

Dear Friends,

My Name is Hassan. Sorry I can't talk to you at the moment but I'm hoping some day I will be able to. I have written this letter with help, to tell you all about my life in Somalia and why I moved here.

In Somalia,it was very different as we only ate meat and rice and life in my village was so colourful. In our village the deep blue sky one day turned a murky purple and soldiers were all over killing my uncle. The noise of screams and smell of war were so strong. My mother and father shouted that we had to leave. My boat journey was exciting, until we got off. Me and my family had to stay in a refugee camp, until our plane finally came.

When I came to England, everything seemed dull and grey. On my first day here I felt strange as I had usually started the day much earlier, but here I slept longer.

Although I really missed Somalia, the children's smiles still help me inside.

Hassan

By Maisie G, Y3

 

Nola Ellen (consultant guest speaker, June 2017)

"I’m really impressed with your whole school approach to learning about refugees beyond these workshops and outside of world refugee week."

 

Year 5 - Diary from a Refugee

Year 5 spent time to write their own diaries from the points of view of refugees.

Outcomes

All year groups will have empathy for the plight of world refugees.

All year groups will have extended their awareness of who refugees are.

All children will be able to make more sense of confusing external references to "immigrants" and "refugees"

In May, Christian Aid visited and Year 3 wrote them thank you letters to say thankyou for all the hard work they were doing on behalf of people caught within disasters.

 

 

 

 

 

 Dear Friends,

My name is Hassan. I have been wanting to write you this letter for a long time and with some help, I did! I'm sure you will understand what I've been through.

I lived in a village in a country called Somalia. I lived with my mother, father, grandparents, uncle, aunty and cousins and we had a cat too. Musa is his name. It is strange to have lessons inside school now, because in Somalia I always used to have lessons outdoors!

Everything was normal and peaceful, until the soldiers came. Men came to our house in monstrous trucks and they marched with guns. It was terrifying. These horrible people killed my uncle and burned my house down. Soon, the village was full of people fighting. In the end we had to leave with only my father's prayer mat and Qu'ran.

We had to go to a Refugee Camp, which upset me. The camp was crammed and smelly, with little food. Luckily, children were fed first. People stole things off us because we were able to buy tickets to England. I was so scared I thought the plane had bombs in it too. My grandparents and cousins stayed behind.

When we arrived in England I thought the grey skies were so dull and the blue skies of Somalia were more friendly. The worst thing was going to school but your smiles have really made me feel better.

Sorry I cannot say much but I hope I will be able to soon. I am sure you understand. If you have any questions please ask me.

 

Hassan

by Ana Maria, Y3